Summer school and experimental course


Tissue as active matter --
Quantitative approaches in Developmental biolgy


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Speakers

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Organising
committee:

Fred Wolf
Jörg Großhans
Christoph Schmidt

Morning lectures

The morning lectures start at 9 o'clock at the indicated places, except for the first day, when we will start at 11 o'clock.

Date

Time

Place

Speaker

Title

14.9

11:00

JvL 11

Hiiragi

Symmetry breaking in mouse development

14.9

12:00

JvL 11

Wiegand (Andor)

Fundamentals of CCD cameras

15.9

9:00

JvL 11

Kiehart

Title

15.9

10:00

JvL 11

Alim

Biological Transport Networks

15.9

19:30

City

Social event

Bullerjahn in the Old Town Hall

16.9

9:00

SchSchl

Kruse

Title

16.9

10:00

SchSchl

Wurm (Abberior)

Blinking dyes, STED imaging

17.9

9:00

SchSchl

Boom (Nikon)

STORM imaging

17.9

10:00

SchSchl

Yurlova (Chromotek)

Nanoscopy with Nano-Boosters: 2 nm to the target

18.9

9:00

MPI

Kaschube

Title

18.9

10:00

MPI

Wolf

Title

19.9

9:00

MPI

MacKintosh

Title

19.9

10:00

MPI

Wolf

Title

19.9

18:00

Herberh.

Social event

Walk to Herberhausen, evening at to the Knochenmühle

21.9

9:00

PhysHS5

Grashoff

How cells feel tissue stiffness- second-generation biosensors to measure molecular tension in cells

21.9

10:00

PhysHS5

Franz

Quantitating cell-matrix interactions using atomic force microscopy

22.9

9:00

PhysHS5

Oates

Title

22.9

10:00

PhysHS5

Pohl

Title

23.9

9:00

PhysHS5

Gorfinkiel

From actomyosin oscillations to tissue-level deformations during Doral Closure in Drosophila

24.9

9:00

PhysHS5

Fabry

Power-laws in cell and tissue rheology

24.9

10:00

PhysHS5

Heisenberg

Title

24.9

19:30

City

Social event

to be announced

25.9

9:00

PhysHS5

Kashef

From cell adhesion to cell migration and 4D in vivo imaging

25.9

10:00

PhysHS5

Grosshans

Closing remarks, Departure

JvL 11. Justus-von-Liebig Weg 11, lecture hall in the ground floor
SchSchl. Lecture hall in the Schwann-Schleiden building
MPI. Ludwig Prantl lecture hall at the MPI for Dynamics and self-organisation, Am Fassberg
PhysHS5. Lecture hall 5 at the Physics building. Please find here the maps.



Practical course

During the two weeks each participant conducts four experiments (each two days) in addition to the theory block.

Please find here the assignment to the experiments.


Theory, statistics, computation

The Theory block taken by all participants on 18.+19. Sept. The theory block is taught by Fred Wolf, Karen Alim and Matthias Kaschube at the MPI Dynamics and Self-organization, Fassberg


Hands-on experiments with quantification

Each participants will choose four projects out of eight options.


1. Laser cutting of cell junctions in Drosophila embryos. J Großhans, D Kong at the Institute for Dev. Biochemistry, JvL Weg 11, UniCampus Nord)
You will learn to use a pulsed UV laser (355 nm) linked to a spinning disc microscope for cutting epithelial cell junctions. By quantification of the recoil velocity, the tension at the junction will be determined and related to developmental and tissue parameters.


2. Atomic force microscopy, A Janshoff, C Franz at the Physical Chemistry, UniCampus Nord). We will use timelapse imaging by atomic force microscopy to visualize the re-arrangement of collagen nanofibrils by living cells with molecular resolution. The generated AFM images will be processed, analyzed and transformed into 3D representations.


3. Microrheology, C Schmidt (Biophysics, UniCampus Nord)


4. STORM microscopy, M Simons, M Mitkovski at the MPI Experimental Medicine, Robert-Koch-Strasse
STORM super-resolution imaging will be performed on a Nikon microscope to visualize axon and glia contact in the central nervous system. By sequential activation and time-resolved localization of photoswitchable fluorophores high resolution images will be created. ImageJ plugin will be used to for image reconstruction.


5. Cell dynamics in Dictyostelium, M Tarantola, E Bodenschatz (MPI Dynamics and Self-organization, Faßberg)
The response of the amoeba dictyostelium discoideum to the emission of cAMP can be seen as beautiful waves under a dark field microscope, starting from a few starving cells which can give rise to macroscopic dynamics exhibiting typical excitable media attractor states. This transition indicates that the dynamical properties of the medium have changed and also reflect the extent of synchronization among the amoeba. In the experiment series of this summer school, we will systematically analyze this transition by varying properties of the substrate, e.g. increasing stiffness of agar geles (including the corresponding diffusion of AMP), but will also interfere with the cell-substrate and cell-cell adhesion apparatus by employing knock-out mutants.


6. SPIM microscopy of early Drosophila embryos, J Großhans, T Aspelmeier at the Institute for Dev. Biochemistry, JvL Weg 11, UniCampus Nord)
You will learn to use the SPIM microscope (Zeiss) for imaging of whole Drosophila embryos. Following recording we will perform a segmentation of the 4D image stacks to extract the trajectories of all nuclei. We will analyse the speed of mitotic waves and establish flow fields of the nuclei in 3D.


7. Cell migration with Xenopus, J Kaschef at the Institute for Dev Biochemistry, JvL Weg 11, UniCampus Nord)
The cranial neural crest (CNC) is a highly motile and multipotent cell population specific for vertebrates giving rise to a variety of craniofacial cell types such as cartilage, bones, melanocytes and elements of the peripheral nervous system. In Xenopus, CNC cells start migrating first as a cohesive sheet and later disseminate into single cells making them an excellent model for both collective migration and cancer metastasis. The designated aim of the course is (1) to get an overview about Xenopus as an important model organism and (2) to investigate by explantation and transplantation experiments combined with time-lapse microscopy the migration of CNC cells in vitro and in vivo.


8. Dynamics of cortical actin in C elegans, C Pohl at the MPI Dynamics and Self-organization, Fassberg
Contractile cortical actomyosin flows are drivers of diverse developmental processes such as cell division and polarization. In this experiment, we will study the elementary principles and regulation of cortical contractile flow in the one cell C. elegans embryo using time-lapse microscopy and particle image velocimetry.